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What is Ramadan Mubarak & Ramadan Kareem?



What is Ramadan Mubarak &  Ramadan Kareem,Ramazan Mubarak
What is Ramadan Mubarak &  Ramadan Kareem
Ramadan is just around the corner and, no matter what your religion might be, you will feel the festive change in the air. As people greet and wish each other, you will hear two expressions used particularly– Ramadan Mubarak and Ramadan Kareem.
Though seemingly interchangeable, they both have a distinct and unique significance. To understand what they mean and how to use them, read on.



What is Ramadan?


To understand the greetings, first, you need to understand what Ramadan is.
Ramadan is the name given to the practices followed to commemorate and honour the revelation of the Holy Quran to the Prophet Muhammad (PBUH). It is the name of the month in the Islamic calendar where these are carried out. The training includes fasting from sustenance, any negative conduct and musings; and saying explicit petitions.

What is the significance of Ramadan Mubarak and Ramadan Kareem?

Ramadan Mubarak can signify 'respected Ramadan' and can be deciphered as 'Cheerful Ramadan'. It is something you say to politely greet one during the sacred month of Ramadan to wish them well during the fasting and prayers and to invoke blessings upon their endeavour. Ramadan Kareem signifies 'liberal Ramadan', and is said to others as a gift; as though you're stating 'may Ramadan be liberal to you'.
What is Ramadan Mubarak &  Ramadan Kareem,Ramazan mubarak
What is Ramadan Mubarak &  Ramadan Kareem

While it has consistently been conventional to wish Ramadan Mubarak during the blessed month, as indicated by a few, Ramadan Kareem isn't viewed as proper by all since it is accepted to be against the soul of fasting and supplication to expect or offer liberality. Some state it ought not be said during the Ramadan month. However, others believe that it is all right to say as it is referring to the rewards one reaps after the month is over. Some might say it to convey the generosity of rewards for their prayers towards them. It varies from person to person.

Which should you say?


While both are said to convey positive sentiments and could be expressed to wish one, it is entirely up to you whether you use 'Ramadan Mubarak' or 'Ramadan Kareem' as a greeting. It's important to know your audience and their point of view on the greeting before wishing them as such. For while you might only intend to express positive wishes, you might make the person you are wishing or others uncomfortable if you don't make the right choice.


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